F1 Impact: How Can The Williams F1 Team Help Supermarkets?

by Paul McAndrew
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Formula One teams began life in the 1950s as nothing more than racing outfits which sent a car to the track. A lot has changed since then as the amount of money needed to keep their wheels turning has accelerated.

Now the teams aren’t just 200 mile per hour billboards for their brands, they are high-tech testbeds for automotive or IT companies which want to see how their products perform under extreme speed and stress.

 

British outfit Williams has capitalised on this by launching an advanced engineering division which provides technical innovation, engineering, testing, and manufacturing services to a range of sectors from civil aerospace to defence and energy. It specialises in lightweight materials, hybrid power systems and electronics, advanced aerodynamics, vehicle dynamics, and holistic integration capabilities.

Essentially it allows other industries outside F1 to benefit from the cutting-edge processes and products which are developed in the sport. They can have the most unlikely of applications as Craig Wilson, Managing Director of Williams Advanced Engineering, explains.

Which of your facilities are used by non-motorsport companies?

In 2010 Williams created a new division called Williams Advanced Engineering, which is set up to take F1 bred know-how and technology into the automotive, motorsport, energy, aerospace, defence and health sectors. The business has a dedicated facility, opened in 2014, that includes design, build and test facilities that are used for projects we complete for external customers.

Furthermore, Williams Advanced Engineering is based on the same site as Williams’ F1 operations. There are certain resources that customers of Williams Advanced Engineering can utilise from our F1 operations, such as two wind tunnels and low volume composite manufacture.
Formula One teams began life in the 1950s as nothing more than racing outfits which sent a car to the track. A lot has changed since then as the amount of money needed to keep their wheels turning has accelerated.

Now the teams aren’t just 200 mile per hour billboards for their brands, they are high-tech testbeds for automotive or IT companies which want to see how their products perform under extreme speed and stress.

British outfit Williams has capitalised on this by launching an advanced engineering division which provides technical innovation, engineering, testing, and manufacturing services to a range of sectors from civil aerospace to defence and energy. It specialises in lightweight materials, hybrid power systems and electronics, advanced aerodynamics, vehicle dynamics, and holistic integration capabilities.

Essentially it allows other industries outside F1 to benefit from the cutting-edge processes and products which are developed in the sport. They can have the most unlikely of applications as Craig Wilson, Managing Director of Williams Advanced Engineering, explains.

Which of your facilities are used by non-motorsport companies?

In 2010 Williams created a new division called Williams Advanced Engineering, which is set up to take F1 bred know-how and technology into the automotive, motorsport, energy, aerospace, defence and health sectors. The business has a dedicated facility, opened in 2014, that includes design, build and test facilities that are used for projects we complete for external customers.

Furthermore, Williams Advanced Engineering is based on the same site as Williams’ F1 operations. There are certain resources that customers of Williams Advanced Engineering can utilise from our F1 operations, such as two wind tunnels and low volume composite manufacture.